Meagan Francis

Meagan Francis

Peace lilies — which are not true lilies, but a member of the Araceae family of flowering plants – are renowned for their easy care. The peace lily is hardy, forgiving, and will even let you know when it is thirsty — look for the telltale droop. The shade-loving tropical plant is also known for its air-purifying abilities – it’s great at breaking down and neutralizing toxic gases like carbon monoxide and formaldehyde.


Grow Your Peace Lily in a Chic Container Like These 9 photos

Talk about looking out for you! While peace lilies are known for their resilience, following these easy peace lily care steps that will help yours thrive, not just survive:

  • Light and Shade: Peace lilies love shade and some indirect light. A spot 5-7 feet away from a south- or west-facing window will often provide the right mix. Yellowing leaves, brown spots or streaks may mean that your plant is getting too much light, so try moving the plant a little further from the window or experiment with a new, less sunny location. Peace lilies can sometimes even do well under a fluorescent light without any sunlight at all! If you move your plant into a shadier location and its leaves are still brown, it may need a bit of misting on the leaves.
  • Temperature: Peace lilies like a consistent temperature between about 65 and 80 degrees F. Protect your plant from drafts and cold or drastic changes in temperature.
  • Fertilize: Spring and summer, use an organic fertilizer to help your plant bloom. Keep in mind that peace lilies are sensitive to chemical fertilizers, so organic options are best.
  • Water: Peace lilies like to be watered a lot at once, but also need a chance to dry out afterward. The plant will droop a bit when thirsty, telling you when it needs a drink! If you pay attention to when it usually starts to sag,  you can plan to water one day before it generally happens. Watering about once a week and spritzing leaves with water throughout the summer will help keep your peace lily hydrated. If your plant seems to completely droop, don’t give up: water and spritz and give it a chance to revive. If your water is chlorine-heavy, let a container of water stand overnight before watering the plant.
  • Drainage: Peace lilies are susceptible to root rot, so it’s very important to make sure the plant has a chance to dry out between waterings and that the container it lives in drains well. If your peace lily starts to wilt, check the roots to make sure they are firm and light-colored rather than soggy.
  • Transplant: When your plant’s roots show or your peace lily seems to be drinking up all its water within a few days, re-pot into a larger container. Your plant may need to be gradually moved into larger and larger containers, but generally peace lilies won’t need to go into a pot larger than 10 inches.

Expect your peace lily to show off its familiar white blooms in the spring. The plant is mildly toxic to animals and humans, so keep away from small children and Fluffy, and wash your hands after handling your plant as it produces crystals that can irritate skin. Follow these peace lily care tips and, with some experimentation, your peace lily should bring beauty to your house for years to come!

19 Comments About this Article

  • Karen Burrious
    I've read the do's and don't here and learned I've not been kind to my peace lily. I have moved it to a better location indoors. My problem is that most of the leaves have brown edges. What can I do?

    Posted 10 months ago

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  • Dai Furuta
    Same here Karen but those leaves with brown edges are matured and large. New leaves that I have are green and no brown edge but small. Felder, Thanks for replying and your advise. I will try to make more holes... Do I still fertilize? I used to fertilize with Seaweed liquid fertilizer that recommended by Art Knapp. I hear no harm to plants. Besides, Peace Lily in such a condition and winter is coming but it is inside of a room and also I closed A/C vent that is located in this room.

    Posted 10 months ago

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  • Nancy Struve Marr
    My daughter gave me her lily to take care of. It has bloomed and has new leaves. She said she was told the plant would grow to be a large plant. After at least three years, it is still only about fifteen inches tall. Are there different varieties? Or does it take years to get large?

    Posted 10 months ago

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  • Lacey Ross
    I have had my peace lily for about four years now, I was given it after my grandfathers funeral. It was once very large, much larger than it is now. The flowers have always been fairly small, but tend to bloom two to three times a year. For the last year or so the leaves have started to turn black and look almost burnt. I rarely give it fertilizer and I keep it in a lower light area. I lightly water it once a week, and only if it needs it, I also mist it around two times a week. The plant seems to be getting smaller and smaller as the year has gone on. The plant is a trooper and I would hate to lose it. What can I do to help the poor guy out? I have thought of moving it to a smaller pot.

    Posted 7 months ago

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  • felder
    most potted plants need repotting every few years, with fresh potting soil. a little fertilizer once or twice a year is usually plenty. if the plant is getting crowded, you may need to divide the plant into two or more smaller ones. the misting is a waste of time, lasts just a few minutes until it evaporates. especially if the plant is in a heater or AC draft. it will grow better in moderate light...

    Posted 7 months ago

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  • Lacey Ross
    I do not think the plant is getting over crowded, as the plant takes up less than half of the pot. When I first put it in its current pot, which would have to a been last spring (2013), the plant was much larger than it is now. I made sure the pot was cleaned and sanitized before placing new soil, the same brand I have always used and use on all my other plants, and the plant inside. None of my plants are near heaters or AC units. As I have stated, I rarely fertilize that plant...just when I re-pot them. The problem seems to have started since placing it in the pot it is now. There is plenty of drainage holes, and it drains nicely. I always dump extra water from the pan at the bottom, as I don't want my animals to drink it. I have not other problems with my other plants, just this guy.

    Posted 7 months ago

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  • Keri Lynn Friedl
    Mine is growing green flowers and existing white flowers have turned green! Help.

    Posted 5 months ago

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  • Michael Conner
    Had 3 MASSIVE lilies that we divided and added homemade compost to the new pots...Have to say they are doing excellent and can't wait til the night temps are suitable to put them back outside. Am sure there will be a need to divide again after the Summer...To Keri...my experience with green flowers is too much water and not enough sun...

    Posted 5 months ago

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  • Rosemary Sanders Ragan
    My Peace Lily is large and healthy looking, but the flowers are small and on short stems. It does bloom frequently. Any suggestions?

    Posted 2 months ago

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  • MaryT
    I just re-potted my large peace lily from the store to a decorative pot twice the size it was and within a day it is showing signs of drooping leaves and starting to turn a lighter yellow. I have it outside under my door entrance. It doesn't get sun at all. Could it be in shock? I felt the soil and it's still moist. Please help!!!

    Posted 1 month ago

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